LA man urges people to give Abercrombie clothes to homeless

LA man urges people to give Abercrombie clothes to homeless (Image 1)
LA man urges people to give Abercrombie clothes to homeless (Image 1)

A
Los Angeles man has come up with a clever way to strike at Abercrombie &
Fitch's desire to target only the cool kids – by giving the popular brand's
clothes to homeless people in Los Angeles.

In
a YouTube video, Greg Karber lashes out at Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Mike
Jeffries, who told Salon magazine in 2006:

“In
every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the
not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the
attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot
of people don't belong [in our clothes], and they can't belong.

“Are we
exclusionary? Absolutely. Those companies that are in trouble are trying to
target everybody: young, old, fat, skinny. But then you become totally vanilla.
You don't alienate anybody, but you don't excite anybody, either.”

The
company uses sexually suggestive, fit models, and is not known for having
clothes that fit larger people. The issue cropped again this month, when a
business writer, Robin Lewis of The Robin Report, discussed the issue with
Business Insider.

“He doesn't want
larger people shopping in his store, he wants thin and beautiful people,”
Lewis told Business Insider. “He doesn't want his core
customers to see people who aren't as hot as them wearing his clothing. People
who wear his clothing should feel like they're one of the 'cool kids.'”

Those comments by Lewis, and the links to the original Salon article, zoomed
around the Internet this month and sparked powerful responses.

Protesters
have gathered at an Abercrombie & Fitch store in Chicago. And then Karber
put together his video, with the #FitchTheHomeless hashtag.

“Together, we can make Abercrombie & Fitch the world's
No. 1 brand of homeless apparel,” Karber says on his video.

Overall, however, Abercrombie's stock price has not been impacted. The stock traded at below $30 a share last August and is now trading at more than $53 a share.

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