Raleigh diners enjoy first Sunday since city adopted ‘Brunch Bill’ rules

Brunch Sunday in Raleigh. Photo by Kelly Kennedy/CBS North Carolina

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) — On Wednesday Raleigh leaders voted to become the second North Carolina city to “free the mimosa.”

So, if you find yourself craving a Bloody Mary with bacon at 10 a.m., you can now have it at Sunday brunch in Raleigh.

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“It hits the spot at 11 o’clock on a Sunday morning, I’ll tell ya that,” said Neil Ivy, as he sipped a mimosa at Sunday brunch at Buku.

The city of Raleigh approved the brunch bill on Wednesday, which means restaurants and stores can now serve alcohol at 10 a.m. instead of noon on Sunday.

CLICK HERE FOR A LIST OF LOCALITIES THAT ARE CONSIDERING OR HAVE APPROVED THE BRUNCH BILL

“It’s a great boost for us when we’re doing early morning live sports broadcasts from Europe, so everyone can enjoy their drink of choice when they’re watching the game now,” said Frank Bloom, director of marketing and events at Hibernian Hospitality Group.

Logan Beam manages Buku. She says before the new law most people waited until noon to have brunch on Sunday, but she’s hopeful that will now change.

She says before the new law most people waited until noon to have brunch on Sunday, but she’s hopeful that will now change.

“A lot of people come in for brunch celebrating things so, I think it will make it a more easily flowing brunch with us being able to take more reservations at 10 or 11 rather than a lot of people waiting until 12 to make a reservation,” said Beam.

Employees with Buku and Hibernian Pub both say they saw larger crowds than usual at brunch Sunday morning.

“It’s a wise move,” said Ivey.

Pastor William Newkirk doesn’t think it’s wise at all. He thinks the so-called Brunch Bill will do more harm than good.

“We need to reverence God, respect him and give him his due,” said Newkirk, Pastor of Oak City Baptist Church. “We normally do that on Sunday mornings anywhere from 8 o’clock up until 12 or 1 o’clock and to pass the brunch bill to begin at 10 to me is an insult.”

The Hibernian normally opens at 11 a.m. on Sundays, but employees say now that the brunch bill’s passed, they might start opening earlier.

The city of Chapel Hill is holding a special meeting Monday to vote on the brunch bill.

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