Was your name unknowingly submitted to FCC about net neutrality?

FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, Federal Communication Commission Commissioner Ajit Pai speaks during an open hearing and vote on "Net Neutrality" in Washington. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai is following through on his pledge to repeal 2015 regulations designed to ensure that internet service providers treat all online content and apps equally. Pai distributed his alternative plan to the net neutrality rules to other FCC commissioners Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017, in preparation for a Dec. 14 vote on the proposal. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2015, file photo, Federal Communication Commission Commissioner Ajit Pai speaks during an open hearing and vote on "Net Neutrality" in Washington. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai is following through on his pledge to repeal 2015 regulations designed to ensure that internet service providers treat all online content and apps equally. Pai distributed his alternative plan to the net neutrality rules to other FCC commissioners Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017, in preparation for a Dec. 14 vote on the proposal. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)


RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) – One of the key things about our democracy is the ability to speak out on issues that concern us and when a government agency is going to make a decision on an issue of public importance, it usually asks for public comments.

That was the case with FCC’s upcoming vote on net neutrality, except there have been claims millions of those comments have been fake.

More than 22 million comments were submitted online to the FCC about net neutrality.

It’s a hot button issue.

Here’s why.

Under net neutrality, your internet service provider streams video, email, gaming and social media to your home for one set price.

With no net neutrality your internet service prover could charge you separately for video, email, gaming, and social media which could be way more expensive than it is now.

One way the FCC gets public input on issues like that is by allowing online comments on a special webpage but, some are claiming up to a million and a half comments submitted to the FCC regarding net neutrality are fake.

Today, 37 senators called on the FCC chairman to delay the Dec. 14 vote on net neutrality because of fake comments submitted online.

One of those fake comments hit close to home for reporter Steve Sbraccia.

It’s supposedly made by his wife. Submitted back in July to the FCC, it goes into a lengthy explanation of why she wants to keep net neutrality.

The problem is, Sbraccia’s wife says she never wrote it and was stunned when he showed it to her.

How did Sbraccia find it that comment? He used this tool designed by the New York State attorney general who is investigating the fake comments.

You simply put in your name in special box, click it, and box and it searches the FCC’s net neutrality comment data base.

Once Sbraccia knew the fake comment was out there, he and his wife began putting in names of other people they knew to see who else showed up.

It turns out his wife’s best friend also has a comment posted, but her comment was against net neutrality.

She told Sbraccia she didn’t make that comment and was unaware of what net neutrality was.

Who is behind these fake comments on both sides of the issue? They’re still trying to figure that out.

But, if you want to figure out if you’ve had fake comments posted in your name to the FCC, use the link to the data base search tool, then use this link to tell the FCC your name was used without your permission in the creation of a fake comment on Net Neutrality.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s